Friday, August 28, 2015

Venice Public Art Walls @ The Venice Boardwalk

Lazy strolls along the Venice Beach boardwalk let us revisit many famous Venice murals.
Take a detour off the boardwalk at Winward Avenue, walk out onto the warm sand, and you will catch Venice's fabulous mural show in progress:  amazing graffiti artists at their craft working with incredible colors and designs.


The Venice Public Art Walls   (formerly "The Graffiti Walls") can be painted by just about anyone, which is why all sides of the long walls and structures are always covered with an organic collection of graffiti styles.  The artists' works have been photographed throughout the years, with both reviews and photos submitted to the Google Maps listing, and local organizations like Venice Paparazzi's Venice Public Art Walls Blogger record and archive the artwork for public enjoyment.

Who can paint?  Just about anyone!
Managed by STP-LA Foundation
   info. on applications/rules (as of 7/22/16):  info@stpla.org or bruno@stpla.org, (424) 264-6564

FAMOUS MURALS AT THE VENICE BOARDWALK:

"Endangered Species" (1990) by Emily Winters.  Ocean Front Walk at Park Avenue

"Homage to a Starry Knight" (1990) by Rip Cronk.  Ocean Front Walk at Wave Crest Avenue

"Venice Beach" (1990) by Rip Cronk.  Ocean Front Walk at Wave Crest Avenue

"Venice Beach Chorus Line" by Rip Cronk.  Ocean Front Walk at Clubhouse Avenue

"Venice Kinesis" (1989/2010) by Rip Cronk [after Botticelli].  Speedway Ave. at Winward Ave.

"Touch of Venice" (2012) by Jonas Never.  Speedway Avenue at Winward Avenue

"Morning Shot" (1991) by Rip Cronk.  Speedway Avenue at 18th Place

"Arnold Schwartzenegger" (2013) by Jonas Never.  Speedway Avenue at 18th Place

"Luminaries of Pantheism" (2015) by Levi Ponce.  Ocean Front Walk at South Venice Blvd.

"Venice Beach Chorus Line"
"Homage to a Starry Knight"
"Venice Beach"
"Venice Kinesis"







Sunday, August 23, 2015

The Spheres at MacArthur Park - PUBLIC ART EVENT

PUBLIC ART EVENT
"The Spheres at MacArthur Park"
being unloaded and inflated
More than 3,000 giant brightly colored balls are being floated onto Downtown L.A.'s MacArthur Park lake, part of a playful and ambitious public art event that will last until late September.

The project was developed by Ed and Bernie Massey, co-founders of Portraits of Hope which produces art, education and creative therapy programs for children in schools and hospitals. Nearly 8,500 community volunteers have participated in the project, painting balls as large as 6 feet in diameter and donating resources (Daily Breeze, July 29, 2015).







Wednesday, August 19, 2015

"Lone Sailor" Gazes Across Long Beach Harbor


As you walk or ride along Long Beach's Bluff Park on Ocean Blvd. this summer, stop a moment at the U.S. Navy's Lone Sailor Memorial and take a closer look at its public art focal point:  the WWII Navy seaman, dufflebag at his side and peacoat collar turned up against the wind, gazing out across Long Beach harbor.

"The Lone Sailor" (1984) by Stanley Bleifeld
The bronze statue was cast in 1984 and installed in 2004, and is one of several throughout the United States by sculptor Stanley Bleifeld.  Bleifeld modeled the 7-foot 2-piece sculpture after Petty Officer 1st Class Dan Maloney, yet added the common name William Thompson to the sailor's dufflebag tag (Wikipedia).


More >> Public Art in Public Places 
More >> Google Maps 









Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Heritage of Orange County's Japanese Farmers

Public Art in Public Places Project
"We Too Were Once Strangers"
(2015) by Richard Turner 
Richard Turner's latest sculpture for the City of Santa Ana pays tribute to the area's early Japanese agricultural heritage. Dedicated on July 11, 2015, Turner's bronze, stone and concrete celery stalk sculpture and raised stone platform serve as a memorial to one of the most common crops cultivated in the vicinity by Japanese Issei farmers.

More >> "We Too Were Once Strangers"  
More>> Public Art "We Too Were Once Strangers"   

Public Art in Public Places Project
Flower Street Bike Trail entrance
Flower Street and Sunflower Avenue, Santa Ana